The Quitclaim Deed’s Function in a Contract for Deed Sale

A contract for deed sale can present a convenient alternative to the traditional real estate conveyance. In this owner-financed deal, the buyer usually lives on the property upon the execution of the contract. While enjoying the property, the buyer pays for it in monthly installments, until the agreed-upon price has been paid in full.

Down the road, when full payment is complete, the purchaser formally acquires the title deed. This event occurs through a warranty deed, which guarantees that the seller is the sole party with any claim on the property to be conveyed – no exceptions, unless stated on the deed.

If things don’t go as planned, and the buyer defaults, recovery of the property can be a time-consuming process. Defaults happen, so a seller should consider having the buyer sign a quitclaim deed as part of the execution of the contract. A quitclaim is a non-warranty deed. It conveys property with no warranty for the title. Through this document, if it becomes needed, the buyer will relinquish any claim on the property. 

Here, we look at how the contract for deed sale works, and briefly examine the function of the quitclaim deed.

Continue reading “The Quitclaim Deed’s Function in a Contract for Deed Sale”

A Contract for Deed vs. Traditional Mortgage

Inability to get financing for a home does not always mean that someone does not have the financial means to pay for the home. This is also a way of extending credit to those who might not otherwise qualify for a loan. In fact, various housing advocacy organizations have used this as a way to help low-to-moderate income families achieve homeownership. In a contract for deed, there are no origination fees, application costs, or high closing costs. Rather than having third-party lenders financing the purchase of a home, the seller finances the purchase in a contract for deed.

Continue reading “A Contract for Deed vs. Traditional Mortgage”