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Nebraska Quit Claim Deed

In Nebraska, real property can be transferred from one party to another by executing a quitclaim deed. Quitclaim deeds are accepted, but not statutory in Nebraska.

A quitclaim deed offers no warranties of title. It does not guarantee that the grantor has good title or ownership of the property, and only transfer the grantor's interest, if any, at the time of execution. They are typically used for transfers between family members, in divorce proceedings or other transfers of property pursuant to court order, or to clear title.

A lawful quitclaim deed includes the grantor's full name, mailing address, and marital status, and the grantee's full name, mailing address, marital status, and vesting. Vesting describes how the grantee holds title to the property. Generally, real property is owned in either sole ownership or in co-ownership. For Nebraska residential property, the primary methods for holding title are tenancy in common and joint tenancy. A grant of ownership of real estate to two or more persons is presumed to create a tenancy in common, unless a joint tenancy is expressly stated (Neb. Rev. Stat. 76-118).

As with any conveyance of realty, a quitclaim deed requires a complete legal description of the parcel. Recite the prior deed reference to maintain a clear chain of title, and detail any restrictions associated with the property. The deed should meet all state and local standards of form and content for recorded documents.

Sign the deed in the presence of a notary public or other authorized official. In Nebraska, both spouses must sign the deed to release any marital rights, regardless of whether or not the spouse holds a direct interest in the property (Neb. Rev. Stat. 40-104). For a valid transfer, record the deed at the recording office in the county where the property is located. Contact the same office to confirm accepted forms of payment.

All transfers of real property are subject to a documentary stamp tax. The tax is due at the time of recording. If the transfer is exempt under Neb. Rev. Stat. 76-902, note the reason on the face of the deed and fill out a certificate of exemption.

This article is provided for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for legal advice. Contact an attorney with questions about quitclaim deeds, or for any other issues related to transfers of real property in Nebraska.

Deeds.com Nebraska Quit Claim Deed Forms Have Been Updated as Recently as Monday April 8, 2019

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A. S. said: First, I am glad that you gave a blank copy, an example copy, and a 'guide'. It made it much easier to do. Overall I was very happy with your products and organization... however, things got pretty confusing and I have a pretty 'serious' law background in Real Estate and Civil law. With that said, I spent about 10+ hours getting my work done, using the Deed of Trust and Promissory note from you and there were a few problems: First, it would be FANTASTIC if you actually aligned your guide to actually match the Deed or Promissory Note. What I mean is that if the Deed says 'section (E)' then your guide shouldn't be 'randomly' numbered as 1,2,3, for advice/instructions, but should EXACTLY match 'section (E)'. Some places you have to 'hunt' for what you are looking for, and if you did it based on my suggestion, you wouldn't need to 'hunt' and it would avoid confusion. 2nd: This one really 'hurt'... you had something called the 'Deed of Trust Master Form' yet you had basically no information on what it was or how to use it. The only information you had was a small section at the top of the 'Short Form Deed of Trust Guide'. Holy Cow, was that 'section' super confusing. I still don't know if I did it correctly, but your guide says only put a return address on it and leave the rest of the 16 or so page Deed of Trust beneath it blank... and then include your 'Deed of Trust' (I had to assume the short form deed that I had just created) as part of it. I had to assume that I had to print off the entire 17 page or so title page and blank deed. I also had to assume that the promissory note was supposed to be EXHIBIT A or B on the Short Form Deed. It would be great if someone would take a serious look at that short section in your 'Short Form Deed of Trust Guide' and realize that those of us using your products are seriously turning this into a county clerk to file and that most of us, probably already have a property that has an existing Deed... or at least can find one in the county records if necessary... and make sure that you make a distinction between the Deed for the property that already exists, versus the Deed of Trust and Promissory note that we are trying to file. Thanks.

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walter m. said: directions and getting to forms, printing good, but I wish it could be more simply and clearly presented. We'll see how it finally works out

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Nebraska Quit Claim Deed Form