Deeds.com Real Estate Deeds
Deeds.com Account
Sign In

Louisiana Easement Deed

Louisiana Easement Deed Information

Louisiana law recognizes servitudes, which are similar to easements and can be defined as a burden or charge on one property that is for the benefit of another property. There are two types of servitudes: predial and personal (CC 533). A predial servitude is closely related to an easement appurtenant and is a burden on the servient estate for the benefit of the dominant of estate. A personal servitude is a charge or burden on something for the benefit of an individual. The three types of personal servitude are: usufruct (the use of property for a benefit as long as it is not damaged), habitation, and right-of-use (this is similar to an easement while allowing use of the property but denying full enjoyment of the property) (CC 534). A usufruct can be established by juridical act or by operation of law (CC 544).

As an interest in real property (immovable property) in Louisiana, an easement deed or servitude is subject to the laws of other real estate instruments. The grantor to an easement deed should sign the instrument and have his or her signature acknowledged. Some recording clerks in Louisiana will require the signature to be in authentic form, which although not a statutory requirement is nonetheless a common practice in Louisiana. An instrument in authentic form requires the signature of each party who executed the instrument. Easement deeds may be acknowledged in Louisiana or out-of-state. If executed out of state, an easement will have the same force and effect as if executed by or before a notary public in Louisiana (RS 35:5).

There are three different types of written instruments in Louisiana: the authentic act, the act under private signature duly acknowledged, and the act under private signature or writing. The authentic act is used for most deeds and recorded documents. An authentic act is executed in writing before a notary public, in the presence of two witnesses, and signed by each party who executed the warranty deed or other instrument. Both the witnesses and notary public must sign. The act under private signature duly acknowledged is a written instrument signed before a notary public. The presence of witnesses is not required for the signing of this type of document; however, witnesses need to be present when the notary signs. The act under private signature is not used often.

Easement deeds and other real estate instruments are recorded in the parish at the clerk of courts office in the parish where the real property (immovable) is located. An easement deed is not effective against third persons until the easement deed is filed for registry in the conveyance records of the parish where the real property is located (CC 517). This type of recording act is known as a race statute. Priority of documents is determined by the order of filing.

Deeds.com Louisiana Easement Deed Forms Have Been Updated as Recently as Wednesday November 23, 2022

4.8 out of 5 (3807 Reviews)

What others like you are saying:


THUY N. said: It's convenience.

Reply from Staff: Thank you for your feedback. We really appreciate it. Have a great day!


Yvonne A. said: love your Deeds.com website...

Reply from Staff: Thank you!


Patricia W. said: Had to have help because unable to put phone number in your format. Daughter figured a way around the problem. I am 80 years old but capable of filling out simple forms but not when the format creates problems.

Reply from Staff: Thank you for your feedback. We really appreciate it. Have a great day!


Valerie C. said: Thanks

Reply from Staff: Thank you!


Wanda C. said: Site is very well laid out and easy to use. My only issue is that it wouldn't allow me to change my password, so I'm stuck with the "temporary" one. Not a big deal, but I would have preferred to change it.

Reply from Staff: Thank you for your feedback. We really appreciate it. Have a great day!


Eric D. said: Very helpful and informative. It has saved me time going to get the forms at county recorder / clerk (as my county and state websites dont offer forms on their sites) and also provided help understanding the uses of the specific deed I needed to use.

Reply from Staff: Thank you Eric. Have a great day!


Deeds.com Real Estate Deeds

Use of Deeds.com Legal Forms. On our Site we make available for use self-help "fill in the blank" forms. If you use a form on our Site, you explicitly agree to our Terms of Use. You understand and agree that your purchase and/or use of a form document is neither legal advice nor the practice of law, and that each form and any applicable instructions or guidance is not customized to your particular needs, not guaranteed or warranted to be current, up to date, or accurate.

NO WARRANTY. Do It Yourself Legal Forms available on our Website are not guaranteed to be usable, correct, up to date, or fit for any legal purpose. Use of any Do It Yourself Legal Form from our website is done so AT YOUR OWN RISK.

If you use any Do It Yourself Legal Form available on Deeds.com, you agree that: TO THE EXTENT PERMITTED BY APPLICABLE LAW, IN NO EVENT WILL WE BE LIABLE FOR DAMAGES OF ANY KIND (INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, LOST PROFITS OR ANY SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES) ARISING OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE LEGAL FORMS OR FOR ANY INFORMATION OR SERVICES PROVIDED TO YOU THROUGH THE DEEDS.COM WEBSITE. TO THE EXTENT THE FOREGOING LIMITATION OF LIABILITY IS PROHIBITED, OUR SOLE OBLIGATION TO YOU FOR DAMAGES WILL BE LIMITED TO $100.00.

Nothing on this website should be considered a substitute for the advice of an attorney.

© DEEDS.COM INC. 1997 - 2022 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED | (330) 606-0119 | P.O. Box 5264, Fairlawn, OH 44334