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Florida Grant Deed

A grant deed in Florida can be used to transfer ownership in property from a grantor to a grantee. An estate or interest of freehold, or an estate for a term of more than one year is created, made, granted, transferred, or released by a deed in writing that is signed by the grantor in the presence of two subscribing witnesses (689.01). The grant deed is not mentioned by name in the Florida Revised Statutes, but it can be used in this state to transfer ownership from one living person to another. In a grant deed, the grantor promises that the title has not been previously transferred to anyone other than the grantee and that there are not any encumbrances on the property, other than those that may be stated in the deed. The grant deed does not offer as much protection as a warranty deed.

To entitle a grant deed to be recorded, it must be signed by the grantor, and the execution of the deed must be acknowledged by the party executing it, and proved by two subscribing witnesses or legalized or authenticated by a civil law notary or notary public who affixes his or her official seal, before the officers and in the form or manner dictated by statute. The notary public may serve as a witness, but must sign the document twice if doing so: both as a notary and as a witness. An acknowledgement made in Florida can be made before a judge, clerk, or deputy of any court; a United States commissioner or magistrate; or a notary public or civil law notary of the state. The certificate of acknowledgement or proof must be under the seal of the court or officer (695.03). If acknowledgements are made out of state or in another country, they must conform to the provisions of 695.03(2) and (3).

Unless a grant deed is recorded according to law, it will not be good and effectual in law or in equity against creditors or subsequent purchasers for a valuable consideration and without notice (695.01). Grant deeds should be recorded with the clerk of the circuit court in the county where the property is located. The priority of documents is determined by the order and time of recording.

Deeds.com Florida Grant Deed Forms Have Been Updated as Recently as Thursday August 8, 2019

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Matt G. said: The process went smoothly and gave me what I needed. As an improvement, I would recommend that deeds.com sends an email when there is a new message in the portal. I didn't get any updates and had to log in to track progress each time.

Reply from Staff: Thank you for your feedback. We really appreciate it. Have a great day!


Christine R. said: Ordering and directions were easy. The only thing missing in the instructions was how to record by mail. Thanks!

Reply from Staff: Thank you Christine. We'll work on making it more clear that one can find mailing information in our recording section. Have a great day!


Vickie G. said: The form and instruction were perfect. Thank you.

Reply from Staff: Thank You Vickie!


Earline S. said: Total package. Very prompt with complete instructions & example to complete forms. If you don't want to hire a lawyer, this is pretty simple & will bypass probate.

Reply from Staff: Thank you, we really appreciate your feedback.


A. S. said: First, I am glad that you gave a blank copy, an example copy, and a 'guide'. It made it much easier to do. Overall I was very happy with your products and organization... however, things got pretty confusing and I have a pretty 'serious' law background in Real Estate and Civil law. With that said, I spent about 10+ hours getting my work done, using the Deed of Trust and Promissory note from you and there were a few problems: First, it would be FANTASTIC if you actually aligned your guide to actually match the Deed or Promissory Note. What I mean is that if the Deed says 'section (E)' then your guide shouldn't be 'randomly' numbered as 1,2,3, for advice/instructions, but should EXACTLY match 'section (E)'. Some places you have to 'hunt' for what you are looking for, and if you did it based on my suggestion, you wouldn't need to 'hunt' and it would avoid confusion. 2nd: This one really 'hurt'... you had something called the 'Deed of Trust Master Form' yet you had basically no information on what it was or how to use it. The only information you had was a small section at the top of the 'Short Form Deed of Trust Guide'. Holy Cow, was that 'section' super confusing. I still don't know if I did it correctly, but your guide says only put a return address on it and leave the rest of the 16 or so page Deed of Trust beneath it blank... and then include your 'Deed of Trust' (I had to assume the short form deed that I had just created) as part of it. I had to assume that I had to print off the entire 17 page or so title page and blank deed. I also had to assume that the promissory note was supposed to be EXHIBIT A or B on the Short Form Deed. It would be great if someone would take a serious look at that short section in your 'Short Form Deed of Trust Guide' and realize that those of us using your products are seriously turning this into a county clerk to file and that most of us, probably already have a property that has an existing Deed... or at least can find one in the county records if necessary... and make sure that you make a distinction between the Deed for the property that already exists, versus the Deed of Trust and Promissory note that we are trying to file. Thanks.

Reply from Staff: Thank you for your feedback. We'll have staff review the document for clarity. Have a great day!


Kevin A. said: I LOVE THIS SITE KEEP UP THE GREAT WORK YOUR DOING THNKS KEVIN

Reply from Staff: Thank you!


Florida Grant Deed Form