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Oklahoma Grant Deed

In Oklahoma, title to real property can be transferred from one party to another by executing a grant deed. A standard grant deed conveys an interest in real property to the named grantee with covenants that the title is free of any encumbrances (except for those stated in the deed) and that the grantor holds an interest in the property and is free to convey it. These covenants should be explicitly stated in the text of the deed.

A lawful grant deed includes the grantor's full name, mailing address, and marital status; the consideration given for the transfer; and the grantee's full name, mailing address, marital status, and vesting. Vesting describes how the grantee holds title to the property. Generally, real property is owned in either sole ownership or in co-ownership.

For Oklahoma residential property, the primary methods for holding title are tenancy in common, joint tenancy, and tenancy by entirety. A conveyance of real estate to two or more persons creates a tenancy in common, unless otherwise specified. Only spouses can declare a tenancy by entirety (60 O.S. Section 74).

As with any conveyance of realty, a grant deed requires a complete legal description of the parcel. The legal description must provide the information necessary for indexing as required by Section 287 and 291 of Title 19 O.S. (addition, block & lot, section, township & range, and metes & bounds if necessary for the location). Verify the type of description required with the local county clerk's office. Recite the prior deed reference to maintain a clear chain of title, and detail any restrictions associated with the property.

A grant deed must meet state and local standards for recorded instruments. Sign the deed in the presence of a notary public and record at the clerk's office in the county where the property is located for a valid transfer. Contact the same office to confirm accepted forms of payment. When submitting a deed that is exempt from the Documentary Stamp Tax for recording, cite the exemption claimed on the face of the deed. See 68 O.S. Section 3202 for a list of exemptions. For any questions regarding a transfer of property affecting Indian land, refer to the Bureau of Indian Affairs and contact a lawyer.

This article is provided for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for legal advice. Contact an Oklahoma lawyer with questions related to grant deeds or any other issues related to the transfer of real property.

Deeds.com Oklahoma Grant Deed Forms Have Been Updated as Recently as Wednesday August 14, 2019

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Oklahoma Grant Deed Form