Deeds.com Real Estate Deeds
Deeds.com Account
Sign In

Pennsylvania Trustee Deed

Pennsylvania Trustee Deed Information

Title 20, Chapter 77 of the Pennsylvania Statutes governs trusts in the State of Pennsylvania.

A trust is a wealth management tool commonly used in estate planning. There are three main parties to a trust: the settlor, who funds the trust by conveying assets into it; the trustee, who administers the trust and controls its assets; and the beneficiary, who has a present or future interest in the trust (P.S. 7703). Note that a sole trustee cannot also be the sole beneficiary (P.S. 7732(a)(5)).

Under a trust, the acting trustee manages the trust as directed by the settlor. This arrangement works, in part, because the trustee holds what amounts to a proxy title to the trust's assets. If the trust contains real property that the settlor wishes to sell, the trustee executes and records a document called a trustee's deed to transfer the title to the grantee/buyer -- the settlor is not identified in the transaction.

In most cases, trustee's deeds are modified quitclaim or special warranty deeds. Quitclaim deeds contain no warranties of title, and special warranty deeds only offer the grantee protection against title claims originating while grantor controlled the property. Generally, a trustee uses a quitclaim deed if the settlor and grantee are close relatives (spouses, parent to child, etc.). A trustee of a living trust might also use a quitclaim deed to transfer property out of the trust and to himself as an individual. Third-party purchasers might require a special warranty deed in order to obtain a mortgage or title insurance.

Besides fulfilling the requirements for all instruments affecting real property in the State of Pennsylvania (tax parcel number, legal description, prior deed information, certificate of residence, and so on), the trustee's deed names the trustee as the grantor and gives the date and the name of the trust under which the trustee is acting. A certificate of trust is sometimes included to verify the trust's existence and the trustee's authority to act on behalf of the trust. As with other instruments, the deed must be signed and acknowledged in the presence of a notary, then recorded in the county where the property is situated.

Trust law can be thorny, and each situation is unique. Consult an attorney with specific questions or for complicated circumstances.

Deeds.com Pennsylvania Trustee Deed Forms Have Been Updated as Recently as Tuesday June 21, 2022

4.8 out of 5 (3547 Reviews)

What others like you are saying:


nancy h. said: Once I figured out what I wanted it was great!

Reply from Staff: Thank you Nancy.


Sera E. said: East, fast, reliable. Great service!

Reply from Staff: Thank you!


James P. said: I wish I used this site more often. The format is pretty easy but the messages were invaluable and the staff were great. I was able to complete my transaction in a Covid environment from the security of my own home. Great service and tools!

Reply from Staff: Thank you for your feedback. We really appreciate it. Have a great day!


Robert P. said: Overall, your website was straightforward and easy to navigate. I was able to accomplish what I needed to do very quickly. If needed again, I would certainly use and recommend others to use deeds.com.

Reply from Staff: We appreciate your business and value your feedback. Thank you. Have a wonderful day!


Dale Mary G. said: This was an easy site to use - saving so much time and allowing me to complete what I needed to do. All the added information, guidelines and even a sample completed form. Great!

Reply from Staff: We appreciate your business and value your feedback. Thank you. Have a wonderful day!


Jimmy W. said: The forms where easy to get to and I hope that they will be as easy to fill out.

Reply from Staff: Thank you!


Deeds.com Real Estate Deeds

Use of Deeds.com Legal Forms. On our Site we make available for use self-help "fill in the blank" forms. If you use a form on our Site, you explicitly agree to our Terms of Use. You understand and agree that your purchase and/or use of a form document is neither legal advice nor the practice of law, and that each form and any applicable instructions or guidance is not customized to your particular needs, not guaranteed or warranted to be current, up to date, or accurate.

NO WARRANTY. Do It Yourself Legal Forms available on our Website are not guaranteed to be usable, correct, up to date, or fit for any legal purpose. Use of any Do It Yourself Legal Form from our website is done so AT YOUR OWN RISK.

If you use any Do It Yourself Legal Form available on Deeds.com, you agree that: TO THE EXTENT PERMITTED BY APPLICABLE LAW, IN NO EVENT WILL WE BE LIABLE FOR DAMAGES OF ANY KIND (INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, LOST PROFITS OR ANY SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES) ARISING OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE LEGAL FORMS OR FOR ANY INFORMATION OR SERVICES PROVIDED TO YOU THROUGH THE DEEDS.COM WEBSITE. TO THE EXTENT THE FOREGOING LIMITATION OF LIABILITY IS PROHIBITED, OUR SOLE OBLIGATION TO YOU FOR DAMAGES WILL BE LIMITED TO $100.00.

Nothing on this website should be considered a substitute for the advice of an attorney.

© DEEDS.COM INC. 1997 - 2022 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED | (330) 606-0119 | P.O. Box 5264, Fairlawn, OH 44334