Deeds.com Real Estate Deeds
Deeds.com Account
Sign In

Virginia Transfer on Death Deed

Select County or Independent City where the property is located.

Virginia Transfer on Death Deed Information

Virginia's statutory transfer on death deed became effective on July 1, 2013. These deeds are governed by the Uniform Real Property Transfer on Death Act (URPTODA), which is incorporated into the Virginia statutes at 64.2-621 et seq.

A transfer on death deed is an instrument that allows owners of Virginia real estate to convey land to chosen beneficiaries without the need for a will or probate distribution ( 64.2-624). To be valid, the completed and notarized form must, among other things, meet the same standards as a regular inter vivos deed (one that transfers title while the owner is still living); state that the transfer will only occur at the owner/transferor's death; and be recorded <i>while the transferor is alive</i> in the land records at clerk's office of the county where the property is located ( 64.2-628).

The deeds are revocable, which means that while alive, the owner retains 100% control over the property, may use or sell it as desired, and may also redirect, modify, or even cancel the future transfer at will. As a result, there is no requirement for notice, delivery, acceptance, or consideration, all necessary for standard deeds ( 64.2-629). This is possible because the named beneficiaries only have a potential future interest in the real estate. The process and requirements for revocation are specified in 64.2-630.

During the owner/transferor's life, the recorded transfer on death deed does not change the owner's interest or rights to sell or mortgage the property; grant the beneficiary any interest in the land; change a creditor's interest in the real estate; affect the owner's or beneficiary's eligibility for public assistance; create a legal or equitable interest in favor of the beneficiary; or open the property up to claims from the beneficiary's creditors ( 64.2-631).

When the transferor dies, the title to the real property vests in the beneficiary according to the rules stated in 64.2-632. In some cases, however, the beneficiary may not wish to accept the property. If that happens, he/she may "disclaim all or part of the beneficiary's interest as provided by Chapter 26 ( 64.2-2600 et seq.)" ( 64.2-633).

Overall, Virginia's transfer on death deed adds an efficient, flexible tool for those considering options for estate planning. As with other important financial decisions, take the time to carefully review the different options. Each case is unique, so when in doubt, contact an attorney or other appropriate professional for advice.

Deeds.com Virginia Transfer on Death Deed Forms Have Been Updated as Recently as Friday November 5, 2021

4.8 out of 5 (3209 Reviews)

What others like you are saying:


Bonnie A. said: I little struggle downloading the forms at first but support helped. After that it was a breeze, happy with everything.

Reply from Staff: We appreciate your business and value your feedback. Thank you. Have a wonderful day!


Robert G. said: Very nice. Especially liked that I could re-use the form since I have a couple of properties.

Reply from Staff: Thank you!


Vera P. said: An excellent service!

Reply from Staff: Thank you!


Rick F. said: Your website was very easy to navigate and I accomplished my single task successfully. It was accomplished with zero issues and in a timely fashion. When or if the need arises, I will definitely use your service again. Thank you!

Reply from Staff: Thank you for your feedback. We really appreciate it. Have a great day!


angela t. said: good forms for what i needed.

Reply from Staff: We appreciate your business and value your feedback. Thank you. Have a wonderful day!


Kimberaley J. said: I had no problem printing out the forms, very easy. Also when I called, customer service was very helpful and very polite. Thank you for that, have a great day.

Reply from Staff: Thank you!


Deeds.com Real Estate Deeds

Use of Deeds.com Legal Forms. On our Site we make available for use self-help "fill in the blank" forms. If you use a form on our Site, you explicitly agree to our Terms of Use. You understand and agree that your purchase and/or use of a form document is neither legal advice nor the practice of law, and that each form and any applicable instructions or guidance is not customized to your particular needs, not guaranteed or warranted to be current, up to date, or accurate.

NO WARRANTY. Do It Yourself Legal Forms available on our Website are not guaranteed to be usable, correct, up to date, or fit for any legal purpose. Use of any Do It Yourself Legal Form from our website is done so AT YOUR OWN RISK.

If you use any Do It Yourself Legal Form available on Deeds.com, you agree that: TO THE EXTENT PERMITTED BY APPLICABLE LAW, IN NO EVENT WILL WE BE LIABLE FOR DAMAGES OF ANY KIND (INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, LOST PROFITS OR ANY SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES) ARISING OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE LEGAL FORMS OR FOR ANY INFORMATION OR SERVICES PROVIDED TO YOU THROUGH THE DEEDS.COM WEBSITE. TO THE EXTENT THE FOREGOING LIMITATION OF LIABILITY IS PROHIBITED, OUR SOLE OBLIGATION TO YOU FOR DAMAGES WILL BE LIMITED TO $100.00.

Nothing on this website should be considered a substitute for the advice of an attorney.

© DEEDS.COM INC. 1997 - 2022 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED | (330) 606-0119 | P.O. Box 5264, Fairlawn, OH 44334